The Raw Food Solution with Paul Nison

Hippocrates

“Always take a good look at what you’re about to eat. It’s not so important to know what it is, but it’s critical to know what it was.” –Texas Bix Bender, “Cowboy Wisdom”

It seems a particularly Western idea that in order to attain a high level of health, it must be something we eat, drink or otherwise ingest. The search for a “magic pill,” fueled by unrelenting pharmaceutical media campaigns, enforces this belief. “Here, take this for your headache, take these to lose thahttp://miura-seikotsuin.com/
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t weight, and smear this stuff on your face for everlasting beauty,” yell the pitch men–and we obey, opening our wallets and in many cases ignoring common sense in doing so.

Other cultures focus on such things as yoga, breath, mantras and karma. More archaic societies focused on spirits, gods, ancestor worship, and shamanistic blessings. Of course, these time-intensive alternatives would never do for our breakneck lifestyles where instant gratification is aim of most daily or weekly endeavors.

A fine compromise between these two divergent health strategies is the raw food lifestyle. This month we spoke with raw food advocate, Paul Nison, who was in town on yet another tour of the country touting the true health benefits of eating raw food.

“People are getting interested in it for several reasons,’ observes Paul. “One reason is that they’re sick and they hear that it will cure them. Another reason is it’s a trend, or people think it’s a trend. Hollywood’s picking up on it, so people want to follow what’s in trend. But it’s not really a trend. It’s a diet–it’s a way of eating. People just want to feel better, and they want to avoid diseas